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Bachelor of Science in Electronic Engineering Technology

Prepare to succeed in the highly competitive field of electronics with UMass Lowell's flexible and fully accredited Bachelor of Science in Electronic Engineering Technology.

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Blended On-Campus and Online Bachelor's Degree in Electronic Engineering Technology

Learn to use math and computers to solve circuit problems, test equipment and apply electronics fundamentals to address real-world problems. UMass Lowell's Bachelor's in Electronic Engineering Technology will prepare you for employment in multiple industries, including consumer electronics, telecommunications, and semiconductors - wherever there is a need for the design, testing, and manufacturing of electrical hardware and software. The program will also prepare you to pursue a Master's Degree in Electrical Engineering.

Note: Although some of the courses in this program can be completed online, most courses must be on campus. Students enrolling in this program should purchase an electronic calculator capable of handling logarithmic and trigonometric functions.

12-36 month calendar

Complete in as Little as 12 to 36 Months

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One of the Most Affordable Tuitions in the Nation

Accreditation

This degree program is accredited by the Engineering Technology Accreditation Commission (ETAC) of ABET (https://abet.org).

Learning Outcomes

See the UMass Lowell Francis College of Engineering Program Learning Outcomes and Educational Objectives for the Engineering Technology degree programs.

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One Success Leads to Another

Apply credits from lower credentials to higher ones. Our programs are designed to build upon themselves:

Curriculum Outline

- Total Credits: 120
- View Course Descriptions »

Suggested Program of Study - (40 Courses / 120cr)

Course Descriptions

ECON.2010 Principles of Microeconomics (3cr)

Studies the principles of production and exchange. An introduction to demand, supply, pricing, and output under alternative market structures. Derived demand and resource markets are introduced. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Quantitative Literacy (QL).

ENGL.1010 College Writing I (3cr)

A workshop course that thoroughly explores the writing process from pre-writing to revision, with an emphasis on critical thinking, sound essay structure, mechanics, and academic integrity. Students will read, conduct rhetorical analyses, and practice the skills required for participation in academic discourse. Students will write expository essays throughout the semester, producing a minimum of four formal essays.

ENGL.1020 College Writing II (3cr)

A workshop course that thoroughly explores the academic research writing process with an emphasis on entering into academic conversation. Building on the skills acquired in College Writing I, students will learn to write extensively with source material. Key skills addressed include finding,assessing, and integrating primary and secondary sources, and using proper documentation to ensure academic integrity. Students will produce analytical writing throughout the semester, including a minimum of four formal, researched essays.

ETEC.2130 Electric Circuits I (3cr)

Discusses: electrical circuits; voltage, current and resistance; energy, power and charge; Ohm's Law, Kirchhoff's Current Law and Kirchhoff's Voltage Law; simplification and conversion techniques for networks containing sources and/or resistance; Thevenin's and Norton's theorems; fundamentals of magnetism and magnetic circuits; properties of capacitance and inductance and associated transient behavior of circuits.

ETEC.2140 Circuits II and Laboratory (3cr)

This course provides a continuation of ETEC.2130. Topics include sinusoidal waveforms, phasors, impedance and network elements. Mesh and nodal analysis of AC circuits; series and parallel circuits, superposition and Wye/Delta conversions are also covered. The use of power supplies and various electrical measuring instruments will be studied. DC circuit analysis concepts studied in 17.213 will be verified by laboratory experiments. Written reports are required. Alternate lecture and laboratory sessions.

Requirements:

ETEC.2130 Electric Circuits I.

ETEC.2150 Circuits III and Laboratory (3cr)

This course serves as a continuation of 17.214. Topics to be discussed include maximum power transfer, real and reactive power; resonance; and polyphase systems. Oscilloscopes, voltage, current and phase measurements are demonstrated. Other topics include series and parallel sinusoidal circuits, series-parallel sinusoidal circuits, series resonance, parallel resonance and transformers. Filters, 2-port networks, computer aided circuit analysis (PSPICE). Computer terminals will be available in the laboratory and their use is expected. Written reports are required. Alternate lecture and laboratory sessions.

ETEC.2160 Circuits IV (3cr)

Advanced Circuits is a continuation of passive circuit analysis, where the student is introduced into the frequency domain. LaPlace techniques are used to analyze electric circuits using sources and elements similar to those in earlier circuit analysis courses. The concept of boundary conditions is introduced along with initial value and final value theorems. There is a brief review of mathematical concepts such as logarithm, exponential functions and partial fraction expansion to aid the student for newer analysis techniques. The S plane is introduced as a graphical technique to plot the poles and zeros of a function and acquire an insight into the time domain. The dualities of electrical elements in other engineering fields (mechanical, fluids and thermal) are introduced and analyzed using LaPlace techniques. Bode plots are used as another tool to gain insight into the time domain. The cascade interconnect is introduced along with the concept of transfer functions and the impulse response. Filter circuits are again analyzed but this time in the frequency domain using the concepts of LaPlace and Bode.

ETEC.2720 Introduction to Alternative Energy (3cr)

This course surveys the available alternative energy sources. Alternative energy sources such as solar, wind and thermal are discussed and applied to practical applications. This course will focus on how the different types of alternative energy are used singularly or in a combined alternative energy package in residential, commercial and utility applications. Both grid connected and stand alone applications are reviewed and discussed.

ETEC.3220 Signals and Systems I (3cr)

Introduction to signals and systems. Signal classification, Normalized energy and power. Signal families, time-domain representation by differential equations, linear time invariance, classical solution to various signal families, frequency domain representation, total solution of system with initial conditions. Impulse and pulse response of LTI systems.Convolution methods, Fourier series analysis, Fourier transforms, properties and use, inversion by partial fractions, resides with s-plane vectors, application to LTI systems with initial conditions and sources. Introductions to digital elements and equations.

Requirements:

MATH.2340 & Permission of Ins.

ETEC.3410 Logic Design I and Laboratory (3cr)

This course studies numbers, switching (Boolean) algebra, switching functions, and combinational circuits. Number systems and conversion. Binary codes. Switching algebra. Algebraic simplification of switching functions. Canonical forms of switching functions. Switching function minimization using Karnaugh maps. Two-level and multi-level combinational circuits. Gate conversion. Decoders, encoders, multiplexers, and demultiplexers. Programmable logic devices: read-only memories, programmable logic arrays and programmable array logic.

Notes:

17.341 Logic Design I and Lab and 17.342 Logic Design II and Lab replace 17.346 Logic Design A, 17.347 Logic Design B and 17.348 Logic Design C.

ETEC.3420 Logic Design II and Laboratory (3cr)

This course studies synchronous sequential circuits and register transfer logic. Latches and flip-flops. Registers. Counters. Analysis and design of synchronous sequential circuits. Moore model and Mealy model. Two's complement arithmetic. Algorithmic state machine (ASM) chart. One-hot state assignment. Register transfer logic. Data-path and control circuit. Design of a simple arithmetic processor.

Notes:

17.341 Logic Design I and Lab and 17.342 Logic Design II and Lab replace 17l.346 Logic Design A, 17.347 Logic Design B and 17.348 Logic Design C.

Requirements:

ETEC.3410

ETEC.3500 Control Systems I (3cr)

This course covers the concepts of feedback; open loop and closed loop systems, feedback in electrical and mechanical systems, mathematical models of systems and linear approximations, transfer functions of linear systems, block diagrams and signal flow graphs, sensitivity, control of transient response, disturbance signals, time domain performance: steady state errors, performance indices, stability related to s-plane location of the roots of the characteristic equation, Routh-Hurwitz criterion, graphical analysis techniques: root locus, frequency response as polar plot and Bode diagrams, closed loop frequency response. A control system design project is included in the course.

ETEC.3530 Digital Electronics (3cr)

This course presents the building blocks and concepts associated with digital electronic networks. The material presented will cover the design requirements necessary to develop successfully functioning digital logic circuits. The lectures will cover combinatorial networks, the Eber-Moll Transistor model, state devices, RTL, TTL, ECL, and CMOS logic families, read-only memories (ROMs), static and dynamic MOS random access memories (RAMs), programmable logic arrays (PLAs) and macrocell logic. Homework, based on actual applications, is designed to provide practice in the use of the fundamental circuit design. Real life examples are given to show the application of design theory. Pre-Requisites: 27.356, 17.341.

Requirements:

17.356, ETEC.3410

ETEC.2550 Electronics I and Laboratory (3cr)

This course introduces Electronics from a fundamental perspective and analyses of circuits from a practical point of view. Semiconductor devices and their application are stressed. This course surveys the operating characteristics of pn junction diodes, transistors and operational amplifiers, and analyzes their application in actual circuits. The use of diodes in power switching circuits and the use of transistors in logic circuits and amplifiers will be covered extensively. Examples and homework, based on present-day applications, are designed to provide practice in the use of fundamental concepts and applications. It is expected that following the four-course electronic sequence, students will be able to use the textbook used in this course or other professional level electronic texts for further study of specific electronic topics. The course includes computer applications in solving problems involving models of electronic devices and circuits. Coverage of some topics is based on notes handed out that augments coverage in Sedra and SMith.

ETEC.3560 Electronics II and Laboratory (3cr)

This is the second course in a series of four courses with Labs. It introduces Electronics from a fundamental perspective and analyzes circuits from a practical point of view. Semiconductor devices and their application are stressed. P-and N-channel MOSFETs and junction field effect transistors (FET) will be introduced and discussed. These include linear small-signal AC models, and amplifier. This course surveys the operating characteristics of MOSFET and bipolar junction transistors (BJT) its circuit symbols; nonlinear large signal behavior and operational amplifiers, and analyses; their application in actual circuits. Large signal piecewise linear DC circuits, and small signal AC circuits will be studied. This course will include MOSFET and BJT as used in amplifiers, switches cut-off and saturation will be discussed. Examples and homework, based on present day applications, are designed to provide practice in the use of fundamental concepts, and applications. It is expected that following the four course electronic sequence, students will be able to use the textbook used in this course or other professional level electronic texts for further study of specific electronic topics. The course includes computer applications in solving problems involving models of electronic devices and circuits. Coverage of some topics is based on notes handed out that augments coverage in Sedra and Smith. Pre-Requisites: 17.215, 17.355, 42.226, 92.126

ETEC.3570 Electronics III and Laboratory (3cr)

This course introduces Electronics from a fundamental perspective and analyses of circuits from a practical point of view. It is expected that following the four course electronic sequence, students will be able to use the textbook used in this course or other professional level electronic texts for further study of specific electronic topics. The following topics will be covered: review BJT and MOSFET, differential amplifiers, and frequency response of different types of amplifiers will be discussed, diff. pair, small signal analysis, biasing, current source, active load CMOS, Frequency response, Bode Plots cascode configuration.

ETEC.3580 Electronics IV and Laboratory (3cr)

This course provides the student with the understanding of feedback. The course covers the feedback equations, the four topologies of feedback, two port theory, Bode Plots, active filters, Weinbridge Oscillators, and power amplifiers. There are two experiments the first covers finite gain, finite band width, output resistance, input resistance, and nonlinear distortion. The second covers multiple poles and loop stability, stabilization with three coincident poles, and loop gain for oscillation.

ETEC.3600 Mathematics and Statistics/E.E.T. (3cr)

Uses the computer to apply mathematics, probability and statistics to technological problems. Topics include: probability, statistics, regression, correlation, goodness of fit, variance, probability distributions and the computer solution of algebraic equations associated with multivariable statistical problems. Pre-Requisites: 17.353, 17.358, 17.365

ETEC.3680 Data Conversion and Laboratory (3cr)

This course teaches the fundamentals of data conversion including digital to analog converters (DACs) using R/2R ladder networks, analog to digital converters (ADCs), sampling theory, coding schemes, sources of errors in DAC's and ADC's, voltage to frequency converters, frequency to voltage converters, sample and hold circuits, transfer functions of converters, wave shaping devices, and applications by designing and constructing a data conversion system. Pre-Requisite: 17.341

ETEC.3760 Electromagnetic Theory (3cr)

This course examines waves and phasors, transmission lines as distributed circuits, Smith chart calculations, impedance matching, transients on transmission lines, vector analysis, electrostatics and capacitance, steady current flow in conductors and resistance, magnetostatics and inductance.

ETEC.3830 Microprocessors A (3cr)

Introduces the microprocessor and microprocessor programming through an integrated set of experiments and related lectures. Topics include: binary, decimal, and hexadecimal numbers; the microprocessor; memory devices; structure of microprocessor-based systems; programming and instruction sets; addressing modes; arithmetic, logical, and shift instructions; branch conditions and instructions; indexed addressing; the tack; subroutines; assembly language; floating-point routines; and software development techniques. Approximately one-half of the course time will be an associated laboratory, culminating with a programming project. Pre-Requisite: 17.341

Notes:

Lab components and materials need to be purchased separately.

ETEC.3840 Microprocessors B (3cr)

Extends the skills developed in 17.393 to interfacing the microprocessor to the outside world through an integrated set of experiments and related lectures. Topics include: architecture of microprocessor-based systems; microcontrollers; parallel I/O ports; interrupts; A/D and D/A converters; programmable timers; handshaking; and serial communications. The course will contain a three-week project applying the functions learned to a real world design. Approximately one-half of the course time will be an associated laboratory.

ETEC.3910 Capstone Design (3cr)

The project lab runs for 14 weeks with design, fabrication, and testing of the project during the weeks one through twelve, and the last two weeks for presentation of the projects to the class. It is expected that all projects be presented operational and meeting the design performance requirements. There are exceptions to this. In the case of non-working projects the progress and final report will be heavily relied on for grading. May do project at work (all requirements of reports, presentation, etc. still required). Pre-Requisites: 17.361, or 17.353 and 17.358 and 17.365

ETEC.3920 Capstone Execution (3cr)

The project lab runs for 14 weeks with design, fabrication, and testing of the project during the weeks one through twelve, and the last two weeks for presentation of the projects to the class. It is expected that all projects be presented operational and meeting the design performance requirements. There are exceptions to this. In the case of non-working projects the progress and final report will be heavily relied on for grading. May do project at work (all requirements of reports, presentation, etc. still required).

ETEC.4030 Foundations of Microwave Design (3cr)

An introductory course in the analysis and design of microwave circuits beginning with a review of time-varying electromagnetic field concepts and transmission lines. Smith Chart problems; single and double stub matching; impedance transformer design; microstrip transmission lines, slot lines, coplanar lines; rectangular and circular waveguides; characteristics of low-pass, high-pass, band- pass, band-stop filters; two-port network representation of junctions; Z and Y parameters, ABCD parameters, scattering matrix; microwave measurements; measurement of VSWR, complex impedance, attenuation, and power; noise basic concepts and representation; gain definitions, amplifier design; low-noise amplifiers, power amplifiers, distributed amplifiers, other circuits for microwave applications.

Requirements:

ETEC.2140

ETEC.4270 Digital Signal Processing (3cr)

This course covers the basic theory of digital signal processing. Sampling theory, discrete time signals and systems, and transform methods - Z transform and Fourier series and transforms - are discussed in detail. Computational techniques, such as the Fast Fourier Transform are discussed. The basic concepts of digital filter design are described.

Requirements:

17.353, 92.234, INFO.2670.

ETEC.4590 Power Conversion Design I (3cr)

Power supply design is introduced starting with a simple half wave and full wave rectifier capacitor filter power supply. The student will develop a design process that details performance requirements that will translate into topology selection and component requirements. To improve line and load regulation as well as output voltage tolerance, feedback control is introduced using linear regulator. Circuit elements which effect regulation are explored and the improvements in regulation through regulator gain is demonstrated. Protection circuits, regulator efficiency and thermal design are also introduced. The high frequency switching forward conversion topologies are explored, detailing the output filter design and its effect on control and loop stability. Bode plots are used to determine loop stability and selection of the amplifier's break frequencies. PSPICE is used as a tool to plot over all regulator frequency response. The output filter inductor design is studied with respect to core selection, wire size and thermal analysis. The switching regulator efficiency is also studied. Along with the forward converter, the flyback regulators are also introduced both in continuous and discontinuous mode of operation. Pre-Requisites: 17.350 and 17.365

ETEC.4690 Control Systems II (3cr)

Serves as a complement to 17.350 in that modern approaches to control system design are described. State space modeling techniques are presented. State feedback using pole placement is introduced. State estimation using observers is presented in the context of closed loop state feedback design. Techniques for digital control are discussed along with concepts from optimal and nonlinear control.

Requirements:

ETEC.3500. Directed study.

ETEC.4770 Electromagnetic Theory II (3cr)

Review of Maxwell's equations. The wave equation for free space propagation. Concept of a time varying electromagnetic field. Sinusoidal plane waves. Plane waves in dielectric and conductive media. Poynting's vector, depth and penetration, force and radiation pressure, reflection of EM waves from perfect conductors, dielectrics, and multiple dielectrics. Quarter wave and half-wave matching, polarization, Brewster's angle, and surface waves. Introductory concepts in guided electromagnetic waves including transmission lines, waveguides, and antennas from the viewpoint of Maxwell's equations.

Requirements:

ETEC.3760 and MATH.2340.

INFO.2670 C Programming (3cr)

Introduces students to the techniques of programming in C. The language syntax, semantics, its applications, and the portable library are covered. This course is an introductory course in programming. It does not assume previous programming experience.

Notes:

Students may not receive credit for both the INFO.2110/INFO.2120 sequence and INFO.2670
This course qualifies for free MSDNA software!

MATH.1225 Precalculus Mathematics I (3cr)

This course prepares students for future Calculus coursework. Topics covered include: linear equations, slope of a line, quadratic equations, functions, transformations, inequalities, curve sketching, and systems of equations. Credit is given for only one of the following courses; MATH.1205, MATH.1210, MATH.1225.

MATH.1230 Precalculus Mathematics II (3cr)

A continuation of Math 1200/1225. Covers exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions, and trigonometric identities.

Requirements:

MATH.1210

MATH.1250 Calculus A (3cr)

Serves as a first course in calculus and provides a brief review of analytic geometry and trigonometric functions. The course progresses to the study of inverse functions, limits, continuity, derivatives, rules for differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions, chain rule, implicit differentiation, linear approximation, differentials, and maximum and minimum values.

Notes:

MA. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: MATH.1220 or MATH.1310.

Requirements:

MATH.1230

MATH.1260 Calculus B (3cr)

Serves as a continuation of MATH.1250. The course covers L'Hopital's Rule, optimization problems, Newton's method, sigma notation, integration, area between curves, volume, arc length, surface area, integration by parts, trigonometric substitution, partial fraction decomposition, and improper integrals.

Notes:

MA

Requirements:

MATH.1250

MATH.2250 Calculus C (3cr)

Serves as a continuation of MATH.1260. This course covers integration by parts, integration of trigonometric integrals, trigonometric substitution, partial fraction, numeric integration, improper integrals, L'Hopital's Rule, indeterminate forms, sequences, infinite series, integral tests, comparison tests, alternating series tests, power series, Taylor series, polar coordinates, graphs and areas in polar coordinates, and parametric equations.

Notes:

MA

Requirements:

MATH.1260

MATH.2260 Calculus D (3cr)

Serves as a continuation of MATH.2250. This course covers curvature, cylindrical surfaces, dot and cross products, curves and planes in three space, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, functions of two variables, chain rule, directional derivatives and gradient, tangent planes, and double and triple integrals in rectangular, polar, cylindrical and spherical coordinate systems.

Notes:

MA

Requirements:

MATH.2250 Pre-req

MATH.2340 Differential Equations (3cr)

Topics include methods of solutions for linear and non-linear first order differential equations, linear second order differential equations, higher order linear differential equations, systems of first-order differential equations. Laplace transforms. Numerical methods. Applications to physical systems.

MTEC.2260 Technical Communications for Engineering Technology (3cr)

This course introduces students to presenting ideas, data, and proposals in clear concise formats to maximize understanding and impact. Both written and presentation skills are stressed and familiarity with MS Word, Excel and PowerPoint is preferred but not a prerequisite. The end-product is a complete understanding of the elements which blend together to create effective communication in a technical environment.

Notes:

can be substituted for 42.226

Requirements:

ENGL.1010

PHIL.2030 Introduction to Ethics (3cr)

Examines the basic issues and problems of ethics and values and a survey of some important alternative answers to the questions raised, on both an individual and a social level, by our necessity to act and to live in a rational and human way. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Social Responsibility & Ethics (SRE).

PHIL.3340 Engineering and Ethics (3cr)

A philosophical analysis of the ethical dimensions and responsibilities of the engineering profession. Specific case studies and ethical issues are analyzed through the application of some of the basic concepts and principles of traditional and contemporary ethical theories. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Social Responsibility & Ethics (SRE).

PHYS.1310 Technical Physics I (3cr)

Presents material in both the class and laboratory format. Topics include: vectors; one- and two- dimensional motion; Newton's laws of motion; translational and rotational equilibrium; work and energy; linear momentum; and circular motion and gravitation. Two additional Friday night classes are required.

PHYS.1320 Technical Physics II (3cr)

Covers material in both the class and laboratory format. Rotational dynamics; mechanical vibrations and waves; sound; solids and fluids; thermal physics; heat and law of thermodynamics will be discussed. One session per week. Two additional Friday night classes are required.

Notes:

SL

Requirements:

PHYS.1310

PSYC.1010 Introduction to Psychological Science (3cr)

An introduction course that focuses on application of the scientific method to major areas of psychology: biological, cognitive, developmental, social and personality, and mental and physical health. The course addresses the importance of social and cultural diversity, ethics, variations in human functioning, and applications to life and social action both within these areas and integrated across them. The research basis for knowledge in the field is emphasized.

Notes:

BS

Undergraduate Degree Requirements

All bachelor's degree candidates are required to earn a minimum 2.000 cumulative grade point average (GPA), to present a minimum of 120 semester hours, to fulfill the residency requirements, to conform to the general regulations and requirements of the University, to satisfy the regulations and academic standards of the colleges which exercise jurisdiction over the degrees for which they are matriculating, to satisfy the curriculum requirements established by the departments or programs in their major, and to complete the University's Core Curriculum requirements, which are listed within the program's curriculum outline. For additional information regarding the University's general policies and procedures, transfer credit information and residency requirements; please refer to our Academic Policies & Procedures.

Tuition & Fees

Tuition at UMass Lowell is typically half the cost of private colleges, and our online tuition is among the lowest in the nation. Tuition for online programs offered through the Division of Graduate, Online & Professional Studies is the same whether you live in-state, out-of-state or outside of the U.S.

Fall 2024 Tuition

Cost Per Credit Cost Per 3-Credit Course*

Undergraduate

Online and On Campus $385 $1,155
*Tuition is priced on the listed credit hour unless the contact hour is different. Tuition is then based upon the listed contact hour.

Additional Costs

Cost
Term Registration Fee $30
Returned Check Fee $30
Undergraduate Degree Application $60

Please note: Tuition and fees are subject to change.

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Complete the Online Undergraduate Degree Application Form (preferred), or print, complete and submit the Undergraduate Degree Application .pdf form. Please note: Your application will be processed once we have received your $60 application fee. Return your completed application along with your application fee to:

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To be considered for acceptance into a bachelor's degree program offered through the Division of Graduate, Online & Professional Studies, students must hold a high school diploma or have passed either the GED® or HiSET®. Graduate, Online & Professional Studies operates on a rolling admissions basis and each application is reviewed when the student's file is complete. Students must be admitted to a degree or certificate program in order to be eligible for most financial aid.

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